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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
have been sent to polls across the country, invited by a number of civil rights groups, including the naacp who says there is an effort to suppress minority at the polls. the group sending the observers, the organization for security and cooperation in europe insisting its people will not interfere or influence elections in any way. some american officials are not taking any chances and guaranteeing that they will not. well, let us pause for a moment to consider what the mayor of somerville, massachusetts, has done. getting -- for getting america is the land of the free, including jealously protected -- protection of our first amendment rights, the mayor of the small city, 76,000 people in massachusetts has decided to outlaw the word illegal in connection with the phrase immigrant. they don't want to upset anybody. i said immigrant and illegal in different phrases. we don't know what he thinks it should be instead. we do know, the mayor has just made support illegal illegal. up next, it is an all-out battle for ohio. both candddates campaigning today. can the election be one anywh
series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those trying up? -- drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprentice ship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mentor some nu
was happening with anti-war movement and what was happening with respect to the civil rights movement, and so i would hope that we're going to see more of that. >> how come? >> because young people, they communicate in a lot of different ways and everything moves so fast today that you can set the world on fire in a positive way just through a message that goes through the internet in a way that -- i had to go buy an album or a cartridge, you know. that's old school. >> if you're re-elected, you go into a second term, sasha and malia will be in the midst of their teens. what are you most worried about, malia getting a driver's license, malia going out on a date, or malia being on facebook? >> i'd worry about facebook right now, only because, look, i know the folks at facebook, obviously they've revolutionized the social networks, but malia because she's well known, you know, i'm very keen on her protecting her privacy. she can make her own decisions obviously later as she gets older. but right now, even just for security reasons, she doesn't have a facebook page. dates, that's fine because she
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african- american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to
years. a pbs series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprenticeship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mento
protect you and me from those who would do us harm, threaten our rights and take away our civil liberties whether they be foreign or domestic, unscrupulous businesses, corporations or individuals. i gained a reputation as a legislator committed to working together. i worked with governor mike leavitt to balance the state budget every single year. collaboration is how problems are solved. as your united states senator, i promise you every day i'll work the represent you -- to represent you and this great state. god bless you. god bless utah, and thank you very much. >> moderator: on behalf of the studio audience, our viewing audience and the citizens of utah, we thank you both for running. [applause] >> that debate between candidates to represent utah in the u.s. senate happened on october 17th. it's one of the dozens of debates we've been bringing you this election season. follow campaign 2012 live on the c-span television networks, c-span radio and c-span.org. you can also find us on twitter and facebook, and we've also been taking a look at some of the swing states in play this election
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense for all the commanders. we provide logistical support for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all the geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about. as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key for aviation, fires, information operation, civil affairs, military police, wmd defense capabilities. corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components of the military space program. for example, we are responsible for everything from the sa
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)